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By Tom Verducci, Sports Illustrated (from November 2, 2017)
LOS ANGELES — How do you measure strength, as in the capacity of Houston Strong? Material strength, for example, can be defined as the ability to withstand an applied load without failure. It could be seen in the constellation of needle marks on the left thumb of shortstop Carlos Correa, who revealed only after the Astros won their first World Series Wednesday night that he had received pain-killing injections "every day" since he wrecked his thumb Oct. 14 in the postgame euphoria of his walkoff hit in Game 2 of the American League Championship Series.
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By Eric Hoover, The New York Times (from November 1, 2017)
The admissions process is out of whack. Just ask the heartbroken applicant, rejected by her dream school. Ask high school counselors, who complain that colleges don't reward promising students for the creativity, determination or service to others. Even the gatekeepers at some famous institutions acknowledge, quietly, that the selection system is broken.
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By Louise Lee, Insights by Stanford Business (from October 10, 2017)
In the future, a traditional college degree will remain useful to build fundamental skills, but after graduation, workers will be expected to continue their education throughout their careers. Workers, for instance, may increasingly pursue specific job-oriented qualifications or applied credentials in incremental steps in flexible, lower-cost programs, says Jeff Maggioncalda, chief executive of online learning company Coursera.
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By Steven Beschloss, ASU Now (from October 26, 2017)
In the first years after arriving at Arizona State University in 2002, Michael Crow began handing out a short handbook to managers called "High-Velocity Culture Change." The 44-page book is filled with pithy sayings intended to jolt your thinking and motivate action: "You'll have trouble creating a new culture if you insist on doing it in ways that are consistent with the old one."
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By Paul Glastris, The New York Times (from October 31, 2017)
Usually, when a demographic group is significantly underrepresented on elite college campuses, we consider it a problem. But there is one such problem that almost no one seems to notice or care much about. Nearly 30 percent of college undergraduates are adults, defined by the United States Department of Education as 25 years or older. But at Stanford, the share of undergraduates who are adults is 1.2 percent; at Yale, 0.7 percent; at Princeton, 0.6 percent; at the University of Chicago, 0.2 percent.
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By Benoit Denizet-Lewis, The New York Times (from October 11, 2017)
The disintegration of Jake's life took him by surprise. It happened early in his junior year of high school, while he was taking three Advanced Placement classes, running on his school's cross-country team and traveling to Model United Nations conferences. It was a lot to handle, but Jake - the likable, hard-working oldest sibling in a suburban North Carolina family - was the kind of teenager who handled things. Though he was not prone to boastfulness, the fact was he had never really failed at anything.
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By Alison Cashin & Richard Weissbourd, The Washington Post (from October 16, 2017)
In the spring of 2016, a group of students at a Boston-area high school staged a walkout to protest what they said was daily misogyny and sexual harassment at school, including instances of sexual violence among students. Girls, they said, were called "bitch," "whore" and "slut" in class. Boys catcalled and groped girls in the hallways and stood near water fountains leering at them as they leaned over to drink.
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By Gretchen Morgenson, The New York Times (from October 21, 2017)
In the treacherous world of finance, where investors confront biased advice, hidden costs and onerous fees, one investment giant seems to stand apart - the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association, also known as TIAA. Calling itself a "mission-based organization" with a "nonprofit heritage," TIAA has enjoyed a reputation as a selfless steward of its clients' assets for almost a century.
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By DJ Cashmere, Education Week (from October 26, 2017)
I remember the first time a book ever made me cry: I was curled up in bed, 19 years old, rereading Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird. The famous trial scene had just drawn to a close, and Atticus Finch was making "his lonely walk down the aisle." Atticus' daughter, Jean Louise, better known as Scout, looked down from her hiding place in the "Colored balcony." She heard her name and realized someone was trying to get her attention, so she looked up. "All around us and in the balcony on the opposite wall, the Negroes were getting to their feet." Reverend Sykes, the town's black minister, instructed her, "Miss Jean Louise, stand up. Your father's passin'."
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By Bret Stephens, The New York Times (from October 20, 2017)
Several years ago Robert Zimmer was asked by an audience in China why the University of Chicago was associated with so many winners of the Nobel Prize - 90 in all, counting this month's win by the behavioral economist Richard Thaler. Zimmer, the university's president since 2006, answered that the key was a campus culture committed to "discourse, argument and lack of deference."
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By Susan Shapiro, The New York Times (from October 17, 2017)
I taught my first class at Columbia University's M.F.A program this month, and even though I've been teaching college writing since 1993, I initially felt a little intimidated by the school's regal campus. That, and regretful.
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By Susan Dominus, The New York Times (from October 18, 2017)
I first met Amy Cuddy in January, soon after she moved into a new office at the Harvard School of Public Health. Cuddy was, at the time, officially on the faculty at Harvard Business School, but she was taking a temporary leave, her small box of an office filled with boxes. As she talked about her life in recent years, my attention kept drifting to her left arm, which she had trapped underneath her right leg, which crossed the left. She was slightly hunched over, and yet her right arm, long and lean - she danced for many years - gesticulated freely and expressively, so that the contrast gave the impression of someone in a conflicted emotional state, someone both wanting to tell her story and unsure about doing so.
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By Kevin Roose, The New York Times (from October 15, 2017)
Junior office workers once had a fairly predictable set of daily tasks. Write the sales memo. Build the PowerPoint. Make Coffee. Now, many young professionals have a new mandate: Drag the boss into the 21st century.
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