Independent Schools Association of the Southwest

Education News

News

By Katrina Schwartz, Mind/Shift (from June 14, 2017)
Untangling education research can often feel overwhelming, which may be why many research-based practices take a long time to show up in real classrooms. It could also be one reason John Hattie's work and book, Visible Learning, appeals to so many educators. Rather than focusing on one aspect of teaching, Hattie synthesizes education research done all over the world in a variety of settings into meta analyses, trying to understand what works in classrooms.
Read More

By Sabina Nawaz, Harvard Business Review (from May 15, 2017)
Organizations invest a lot of time and money in hiring the right CEO or senior executive to set a vision and make the changes in their company. Yet within the first 18 months, there's a 50% chance the executive will leave the organization. This failure comes with enormous costs, not only in disruption to the organization but financially, too. One estimate puts the cost at 10 times the executive's salary – sometimes more.
Read More

By Lisa Ward, The Wall Street Journal (from June 8, 2017)
How can you save over $20,000 on college costs? Graduate on time. At four-year schools, only about 40% of full-time students graduate on time, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, part of the U.S. Department of Education.
Read More

By Judith Burns, BBC News (from June 17, 2017)
Modern science produces so much data that scientists can't cope with it all - so why not enlist schoolchildren to help? The new Sky Explorers club at Wheatfields Junior School in St Albans is making use of a night sky camera which has been installed on the building's roof.
Read more

By Lisa Damour, The New York Times (from June 21, 2017)
As summer gets underway, teenagers may be home more often, but that doesn't necessarily mean you'll see more of them. If they retreat to their rooms for hours or seem cagey about their plans, don't take it personally. Following are four truths about teens that may help you and your adolescent coexist.
Read more

By Samantha Schmidt, The Washington Post (from June 5, 2017)
The Facebook messaging group was at one point titled "Harvard memes for horny bourgeois teens." It began when about 100 members of Harvard College's incoming freshman class contacted each other through the university's official Class of 2021 Facebook group. They created a messaging group where students could share memes about popular culture — a growing trend on the Internet among students at elite colleges.
Read More...

By Jillian Berman, Market Watch (from June 5, 2017)
The share of new bachelor's degrees awarded in the humanities dropped below 12% in 2015 for the first time since 1987, according to an analysis released Monday by Humanities Indicators, a project of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences which tracks data on the state of humanities fields. The drop comes after 10 years in a row of declines, including a 5% drop from the previous year and a 9.5% decline from a recent high point in humanities degrees in 2012.
Read More...

By Frank Bruni, The New York Times (from June 3, 2017)
Racism pervades our country. Students who have roiled college campuses from coast to coast have that exactly right. But we're never going to make the progress that we need to if they hurl the word "racist" as reflexively and indiscriminately as some of them do, in a frenzy of righteousness aimed at gagging speakers and strangling debate.
Read More...

BBC News (from June 2, 2017)
Ananya Vinay from Fresno correctly spelled the word marocain - a type of dress fabric - to defeat Rohan Rajeev, 14, from Oklahoma. The rivals had correctly spelled words including cheiropompholyx, durchkomponiert and tchefuncte as each waited for the other to slip up.
Read More...

By Erica L. Green, The New York Times (from June 2, 2017)
Washington - Since her confirmation as the education secretary, Betsy DeVos has been the Trump cabinet member liberals love to hate, denouncing her as an out-of-touch, evangelical billionaire without the desire or capacity to protect vulnerable poor, black, immigrant, gay or transgender students.
Read More...

By Bekah McNeel, The Rivard Report (from February 1, 2017)
Every morning Head of School John Webster takes 15-30 minutes with the San Antonio Academy student body to set the tone for the day. In this short chapel service he is direct, yet affable. His voice is full of genuine concern for the 345 boys gathered in the warm light of Ellison Hall.

More

By Derek Thompson, The Atlantic (from April 1, 2017)
This time of year, thousands of college applicants await e-notices and auspiciously sized envelopes from schools, under terrible pressure from their parents, friends, teachers, and fretful inner-monologues. To this anxious lot, I offer some advice, which comes not only from a bit of experience, but also a bit of empirical research: just chill out, okay?

More

By Elizabeth A. Harris, The New York Times (from April 13, 2017)
Choate Rosemary Hall, the elite Connecticut boarding school, said on Thursday that at least 12 former teachers had sexually molested - and, in at least one case, raped - students in a pattern of abuse dating to the 1960's. The allegations in a report prepared by an investigator for the board of trustees include instances of "intimate kissing" and "intimate touching".

More