Independent Schools Association of the Southwest

Education News

News

By Lizzy Francis, Fatherly (from November 26, 2018)
When you're a kid, everything is a tragedy. Your grilled cheese has the crust on? The horror. Can't assemble that Lego set? Might as well stomp up and down. You can't change this. What you can do, however, is arm your kid with the techniques that teach them how to bounce back from their daily struggles so that, later on in life, when the stakes are higher, they know what to do.
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By Cris Clifford Cullinan, Independent School Magazine (Fall 2017)
There isn't an independent school in this country that isn't struggling to attract and create an increasingly diverse and complex student body. And, it's safe to say, there isn't a school that doesn't want to have a faculty and staff that mirrors that complexity and is able to prepare all students to thrive in this multicultural, hyper-connected, 21st century world.
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By Phyllis Fagell, The Washington Post (from May 22, 2018)
When she was 13, Alexis Lewis invented the Rescue Travois, a wheeled cart that could carry at least two children. She got the idea from reading about the 2011 Somalia famine. "Families were forced to walk for weeks, and parents had to leave kids who were too weak to walk by the roadside to die." Her lifesaving product could be airdropped and easily assembled.
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By Hallie Busta, Education Dive (from December 3, 2018)
"We were down. We were 18 months to two years from closing," said Michael Sorrell, recounting the state of the Dallas-based historically black college when he took the helm in 2007. "And in that situation, we had to make some tough decisions centered around who do we want to be and who can we be."
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After reading the tragic story that is coming out of Breaux Bridge about the T.M. Landry School, I wanted to reach out to you to reaffirm our commitment to your children and in the bigger sense to the children of Acadiana. ESA was founded on the principles of academic and personal integrity that are still front and center in our mission statement today. "Our mission is to instill in every student the habits of scholarship and honor." It is a simple and powerful statement that defines who we are and what we aspire to accomplish.
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By Beth Teitell, The Boston Globe (from December 6, 2018)
Ha ha ha. Plymouth's superintendent of schools, Gary Maestas, allowed himself a short laugh. He was thinking about the real-time vape detectors he's planning to install in the town's high school bathrooms, and how the students don't yet know. "They'll find out soon enough," Maestas said. Ha ha ha.
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By Adam Grant, The New York Times (from December 8, 2018)
A decade ago, at the end of my first semester teaching at Wharton, a student stopped by for office hours. He sat down and burst into tears. My mind started cycling through a list of events that could make a college junior cry: His girlfriend had dumped him; he had been accused of plagiarism. "I just got my first A-minus," he said, his voice shaking.
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By Sarah Brown, The Chronicle of Higher Education (from November 13, 2018)
What does it really take for a college to recover from a racial crisis? That's the question a team of researchers explores in a new American Council on Education report, which spotlights the University of Missouri at Columbia and the 2015 protests that have become a lesson in leadership turmoil across higher education.
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By Susan Fine, Global Online Academy (from November 14, 2018)
There's more free (and good) stuff online for educators than ever before. In particular, the number of relevant, high-quality professional learning resources for educators and school leaders is growing fast. While attending the iNACOL symposium in Nashville, I was struck by how many organizations, for profit and nonprofit, have moved their "collateral" to Open Education Resources (OER). As part of a larger movement in education to think differently about how we approach school, these organizations are curating, publishing, and sharing their research and strategies in a variety of ways, all of them online and open to the public.
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By Hardy Smith, BoardSource (from November 15, 2018)
We've all heard that familiar quote about continuing to do something the exact same way you've done it in the past yet expecting a different result. It's like a dog chasing its tail. Is your nonprofit constantly chasing elusive solutions?
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By Justin Wells, Education Week (from October 25, 2018)
If someone tells me that a school is good, I tend not to believe it.
It's not that I won't believe it, or that I therefore assume that the school is not good. It's just that I like to withhold judgment until I see some evidence (a habit that I hope we instill in our students as well).
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By Brian Sztabnik, Edutopia (from May 1, 2015)
I am an English teacher, so my ears perk up when writers talk about their process. I've found the advice handy for lesson planning, too. That's because both writing and planning deal with craft.
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By Julie Wilson, Education Reimagined (from November 13, 2018)
There is no shortage of ideas for transforming the education system. In the past decade or so, we have witnessed a rising tide of consensus that the acquisition of knowledge is the floor of school performance, and we need to lift our sights higher—preparing our children with the habits of mind that will enable them to thrive in an unknowable future. The national conversation is (at last) shifting from, "How do we close the achievement gap?" to the deeper challenge of addressing the complexity of the relevance gap.
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