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By Lory Hough, Harvard Ed. Magazine (Winter 2019)
Last September, The New York Times came out with a story with a promising opening paragraph that made me happy: "Girls have been told they can be anything they want to be, and it shows. They are seizing opportunities closed to previous generations — in science, sports, and leadership."
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By Howard Gardner (from January 9, 2019)
As we enter 2019, our national study of higher education is in its 7th year! During these years, my colleagues and I have often been asked to speak publicly about our findings. But as long as we were still collecting data, this was not possible; and even after data collection has now been completed, we still have much data analysis to carry out.
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By Leadership and Design (from February 10, 2019)
I've been on the road a lot since the start of the new year. In fact, I'm writing right now from Terminal A at Boston Logan on my way home to CA. In my recent travels, I've found myself on quite a few brand new planes. Sparkling white trays, power outlets, touch screen entertainment systems and wifi that actually work, and discotheque lighting. It's all very modern and hip and with the times. But there is one feature that remains from a time long ago - a testament to our past and a relic that has been preserved: the ashtray. I was 17 years old when smoking was banned on airplanes. Rick Astley and Guns and Roses were at the top of the Billboard charts. It was 1988! Over thirty years since we actually had smokers on planes. And yet, there they are. Completely useless. Patiently waiting for the possibility that we will return to the glory days when people smoked everywhere - especially in airplanes.
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By Jeffrey Shields, Net Assets (from February 12, 2019)
Hiring season is upon us. During a recent meeting with independent school leaders, I asked the simple question, "How many of you interview and hire faculty and staff?" Almost every hand in the room went up. I followed up by asking, "How many of you have ever had interview training?" And every hand in the room went down.
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By Thomas L. Friedman, The New York Times (from February 12, 2019)
A few years ago, the leaders of the College Board, the folks who administer the SAT college entrance exam, asked themselves a radical question: Of all the skills and knowledge that we test young people for that we know are correlated with success in college and in life, which is the most important? Their answer: the ability to master "two codes" — computer science and the U.S. Constitution.
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By Lisa Damour, The New York Times (from February 7, 2019)
From elementary school through college, girls are more disciplined about their schoolwork than boys; they study harder and get better grades. Girls consistently outperform boys academically. And yet, men nonetheless hold a staggering 95 percent of the top positions in the largest public companies.
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By Linda Flanagan, MindShift (from February 7, 2019)
When Vicky Tong started coaching seventh- and eighth-grade cross-country in 2012, she took the job because the school where she teaches needed somebody to do it. Tong figured that this additional work would follow naturally from her duties as a middle school science and Chinese teacher and complement her interest in running. She was training for a half-marathon when the offer arrived, and the timing seemed right.
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By Jonathan D. Grinstein, Scientific American (from February 12, 2019)
We all need sleep. It's a core part of being human, consuming up to a third or more of each day. Without sleep, basic brain processes like attention and memory, the ability to learn, and our overall well-being go haywire. But over the past century, the average amount of sleep for American school-aged children and adolescents has dropped by about 1 hour to just under 7 hours.
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By Catherine Gewertz, Education Week (from January 8, 2019)
The college-admission process exerts a powerful shaping influence on high school students. Eager to secure spots on campus, they scramble to build themselves into the people their dream schools seek, with the requisite honors classes, extracurricular passions, and perfectly structured essays.
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By Ron Ashkenas & Brook Manville, Harvard Business Review (from October 24, 2018)
There's an old story about a tourist who asks a New Yorker how to get to the storied concert venue Carnegie Hall and is told, "Practice, practice, practice." Obviously, this is good advice if you want to become a world-class performer — but it's also good advice if you want to become a top-notch leader.
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By Chris Sturgis, Competency Works (from March 2, 2018)
There's a great quick read in the February AASA School Administrator on standards-based grading and the college admissions process. Four university college admissions staff were interviewed in Getting a Fair Shot about their thoughts about standards-based grading.
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By Laura Krantz, The Boston Globe (from January 15, 2019)
Hampshire College on Tuesday announced its desire to merge with another educational institution, citing financial strain that threatens its future. The school is also evaluating whether to admit a freshman class for the fall.
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By Jennifer Gonzalez, Cult of Pedagogy (from January 6, 2019)
Every January, I launch a brand-new edition of my Teacher's Guide to Tech. As challenging and time-consuming as it is to put this guide together every year, it's also pretty magical. I find myself sitting at my keyboard with a million browser tabs open and it happens—that moment when I come across some idea that someone has brought into the world and I think Holy cow, this is good.
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By Meghan Moravcik Walbert, Offspring (from January 14, 2019)
I have a friend who took kindergarten prep very seriously. When her son began getting homework in preschool ("homework" and "preschool" being two words that should never go together) and he couldn't properly identify on the homework that "car" started with the letter "C," she freaked out.
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By David Brooks, The New York Times (from January 17, 2019)
A few years ago, when I was teaching at Yale, I made an announcement to my class. I said that I was going to have to cancel office hours that day because I was dealing with some personal issues and a friend was coming up to help me sort through them.
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