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By Edmund H. Mahony, Hartford Courant (from February 9, 2018)
A federal appeals court has upheld a $41.7 million jury verdict for a Connecticut private school student who was severely and permanently disabled after developing encephalitis from a tick bite while on a class trip to China.
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By Valerie Strauss, The Washington Post (from December 20, 2017)
The conventional wisdom about 21st century skills holds that students need to master the STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — and learn to code as well because that's where the jobs are. It turns out that is a gross simplification of what students need to know and be able to do, and some proof for that comes from a surprising source: Google.
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By Amy L. Eva, Greater Good Magazine (from January 25, 2018)
Teens can seem self-centered sometimes, can't they?Of course they can; they're still supposed to be developing the capacity to see beyond themselves. They can also seem to lack a strong sense of purpose—and that's not surprising either, because the ability to think about other people is developmentally linked with a sense of purpose.
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By Melinda D. Anderson, The Atlantic (from February 1, 2018)
A class of middle-schoolers in Charlotte, North Carolina, was asked to cite "four reasons why Africans made good slaves." Nine third-grade teachers in suburban Atlanta assigned math word problems about slavery and beatings. A high school in the Los Angeles-area reenacted a slave ship—with students' lying on the dark classroom floor, wrists taped, as staff play the role of slave ship captains. And for a lesson on Colonial America, fifth-graders at a school in northern New Jersey had to create posters advertising slave auctions.
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By Bari Walsh, Useable Knowledge (from November 16, 2017)
We know that early childhood education is a good thing, but even with growing enrollments and public investment, debate periodically erupts about the specific benefits of early education and whether those benefits last or fade away over time. Whenever a study finds smaller-than-expected impacts, a new round of questioning begins.
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By Jia Tolentino, The New Yorker (from February 12, 2018)
If I were asked by a survey to describe my experience with sexual assault in college, I would pinpoint two incidents, both of which occurred at or after parties in my freshman year. In the first case, the guy went after me with sniper accuracy, magnanimously giving me a drink he'd poured upstairs. In the second case, I'm sure the guy had no idea that he was doing something wrong.
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By Michael B. Horn, EducationNext (from February 6, 2018)
The last year certainly turned in its share of surprises. Prominent full-time MBA and law programs folded. Whole colleges closed, as did well-known boot camps. Purdue and Kaplan University stunned the higher education world. Strayer and Capella entered into a mega-merger. And oh yeah—the federal government decided to tax wealthy college endowments.
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By Jill Anderson, Usable Knowledge (from November 29, 2017)
Feelings of worry and anxiety are common in childhood and adolescence (and beyond), and they're normal. But when they become excessive, intrusive, and disruptive, they can compromise a child's ability to learn and to function at school. Left unaddressed, anxiety often leads to depression in young adulthood; it's like the "feeder school for the university of depression," says Lynn Lyons, a licensed clinical social worker and psychotherapist in Concord, New Hampshire. "It just moves in that direction, and we're really seeing teens struggling with both of those things today."
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By Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed (from February 7, 2018)
These days colleges boast about their admissions rankings, their graduation rates, their faculties' achievements and much more. Many say that the statistics are a tool to promote accountability and improvement.Jerry Z. Muller disagrees. His new book, The Tyranny of Metrics (Princeton University Press), critiques not only higher education but many parts of society that rely on metrics.
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By Michele Molnar, EdWeek Market Brief (from January 25, 2018)
What will today's kindergartners need in order to succeed in the world as the Class of 2030? "Student-centricity," according to research conducted by McKinsey & Company on behalf of Microsoft Education, and showcased on the opening day at Bett, the world's largest educational technology show here.
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By Adam Jezard, World Economic Forum (from October 24, 2017)
The walls are coming down in Finland's schools – but not just the physical barriers between classrooms. Also going are divisions between subjects and age ranges, and students have more of a say over what will be learnt than children in many other countries.
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By Paul S. Auerbach, The Wall Street Journal (from January 19, 2018)
Football is entertaining to watch, but it's a violent collision sport that causes the majority of traumatic brain injuries in athletes. During a high-school season, one study finds, nearly 1 in 5 players on any given team will suffer a concussion. Many will suffer more than one. The football establishment needs to address this issue emphatically—and it can do so without changing the essence of the game that millions of Americans love.
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By Jane Adams, The New York Times (from January 18, 2018)
New data from American, Canadian, and British college Students indicates that perfectionism, especially when influenced by social media, has increased by 33 percent since 1989. As a psychologist, I'm not shocked. The study, published last month in the Psychological Bulletin, reflects what my colleagues and I are hearing from our clients and discussing among ourselves: As college students are returning to school after their winter breaks, many parents are concerned about the state of their mental health.
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By Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed (from January 22, 2018)
In recent years, a number of high school districts and a few states have moved to require high school students to complete much more sophisticated projects to assess their eligibility for a high school diploma, and their preparation for college and the world of work.
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