Independent Schools Association of the Southwest

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By Todd Finley, Edutopia (from March, 2019)
Like everybody else, I possess unconscious biases about people that are contingent on how they talk and look. Such instant judgments, called implicit bias, involve "automatically categorizing people according to cultural stereotypes," Sandra Graham and Brian Lowery write in "Priming Unconscious Racial Stereotypes About Adolescent Offenders."
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By Eric Hudson, Global Online Academy (from April 3, 2019)
What is the purpose of school? Both research and practice have taught us that deeper learning results from students finding value and joy in rigorous, relevant learning experiences. Students should view school as a place where they can realize their visions for themselves, a place populated by people who care about them and who can help them succeed in achieving their goals.
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By Joe Pinsker, The Atlantic (from March 28, 2019)
America has long had a fickle relationship with homework. A century or so ago, progressive reformers argued that it made kids unduly stressed, which later led in some cases to district-level bans on it for all grades under seventh. This anti-homework sentiment faded, though, amid mid-century fears that the U.S. was falling behind the Soviet Union (which led to more homework), only to resurface in the 1960s and '70s, when a more open culture came to see homework as stifling play and creativity (which led to less). But this didn't last either: In the '80s, government researchers blamed America's schools for its economic troubles and recommended ramping homework up once more.
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By Amanda Torres, Independent School Magazine (Winter 2019)
Independent schools are facing a new educational landscape. Schools are impacted by rapid changes in the makeup of their student and family populations, the emergence of multiple school options, wealth disparities, the needs of the global economy, and the new role of technology in every aspect of human interaction. Given these changes, how can independent schools evolve and adapt to meet families' needs? A deeper understanding of what drives the demand for our schools is a first necessary step. To that end, NAIS conducted research with parents.
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By Caitlin Flanagan, The Atlantic (from April 4, 2019)
Sweet Christ, vindication! How long has it been? Years? No, decades. If hope is the thing with feathers, I was a plucked bird. Long ago, I surrendered myself to the fact that the horrible, horrible private-school parents of Los Angeles would get away with their nastiness forever. But even before the molting, never in my wildest imaginings had I dared to dream that the arc of the moral universe could describe a 90-degree angle and smite down mine enemies with such a hammer fist of fire and fury that even I have had a moment of thinking, Could this be a bit too much?
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Net Assets (from March 25, 2019)
Grant Lichtman is a former business officer and an internationally recognized thought leader on the transformation of K–12 education. A widely published writer and a popular speaker and facilitator (including at many NBOA events), he is the author of three books, including "Moving the Rock: Seven Levers We Can Press to Transform Education" and "#EdJourney: A Roadmap for the Future of Education." He spent almost 15 years as a senior administrator and trustee at the Francis Parker School in San Diego.
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By Edith Onderick-Harvey, Harvard Business Review (from April 3, 2019)
More than 90% of CEOs believe their companies will change more in the next five years than they did in the last five. Having a workforce that's ready and able to harness that change will make the difference between success and failure.
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By Claire Boston, Bloomberg Businessweek (from April 9, 2019)
To pay for college, Amy Wroblewski sold a piece of her future. Every month, for eight-and-a-half years, she must turn over a set percentage of her salary to investors. Today, about a year after graduation, Wroblewski makes $50,000 a year as a higher education recruiter in Winchester, Va. So the cut comes to $279 a month, less than her car payment.
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By Kyle Korver, The Players' Tribune (from April 8, 2019)When the police break your teammate's leg, you'd think it would wake you up a little. When they arrest him on a New York street, throw him in jail for the night, and leave him with a season-ending injury, you'd think it would sink in. You'd think you'd know there was more to the story. You'd think.
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By Greg Toppo, Inside Higher Ed (from March 20, 2019)
Tolstoy famously wrote that all happy families are alike, while each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way. A new white paper suggests that the Tolstoy rule may not apply when it comes to at-risk small colleges: they're all basically unhappy in the same way.
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By John MacIntosh, CNN (from March 23, 2019)
The college admissions scandal may get elite colleges to do what they should have done long ago: abolish the athletic recruit as a discrete admission category and deprioritize the importance of athletic success.
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By Rachel Simmons, The New York Times (from March 19, 2019)
Many of us watched the college bribery scandal unfold last week as a kind of nationally televised master class in how not to parent a teenager. But even many well-intentioned parents fall into some of the same patterns as the wealthy parents charged in the case: removing obstacles to ensure that their children don't have to deal with frustrations or failures, in a style known as snowplow parenting.
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By Emily Kaplan, Edutopia (from March 1, 2019)
Among people who publish comprehensive, deeply considered books about American education, Ted Dintersmith is not your typical figure. After earning a PhD in engineering from Stanford and working in venture capital for 25 years, Dintersmith decided to make an abrupt late-career switch. Increasingly alarmed at what he saw happening in schools across the United States, he turned his focus to education, embarking on "an ambitious trip" to observe innovative practices at schools in all 50 states.
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By Margaret Renkl, The New York Times (from March 25, 2019)
NASHVILLE — News of the recent college-bribery scandal broke the same week the University of Tennessee announced it would be offering free tuition to Tennessee families earning less than $50,000 a year. The announcement came the day my two younger sons were finishing up their U.T. midterms and packing to come back to Nashville for spring break, where home-cooked meals and fair amount of yardwork awaited them.
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