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By Thomas Chatterton Williams, The New York Times (from May 17, 2019)
Between my freshman and senior years of high school in the late '90s, my father spent his evenings, weekends and vacations drilling my best friend and me for our SATs. My father was born black in the 1930s in the segregated South and became the first member of his family to go to college, let alone graduate school. These were lean years for my family, and my white mother had to return to work after decades as a homemaker. We just managed to rent a small house on the white side of our de facto segregated New Jersey suburb.
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By Bernard Marr, Forbes (from May 22, 2019)
Corporate leaders aren't the only ones who need to consider how to adjust to the new world the 4th Industrial Revolution is ushering in. Educators, schools, government officials, and parents must re-think education and how to prepare the next generation to take advantage of the plethora of opportunities and overcome the challenges enabled by ever-increasing technological change. Here are some of the changes happening because of the 4th Industrial Revolution and eight things every school must do to prepare for the 4th Industrial Revolution.
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By Katrina Schwartz, Mind/Shift (from May 20, 2019)
Kathy Digsby has been teaching elementary school for a long time. She taught kindergarten for many years, then transferred to first grade. And even though she's approaching sixty and planned to retire soon, part of her doesn't want to leave the classroom. Recently she's been mixing it up, injecting choice into as many areas of the classroom as she can to engage her young learners. And it's exciting.
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By David Coleman, The Atlantic (from May 22, 2019)
The crazed pursuit of college admissions helps no one thrive. And while the Varsity Blues admissions scandal shines a light on families that break the rules, it's time to consider the unhappiness of families that play by them. While competition for seats may be inevitable, students scramble to do ever more to get into college—and give away more of their childhood to do so. This competition might seem a problem only for middle class and wealthy families. But students of modest means suffer most when applying to college becomes an endless list of tasks requiring time and other resources.
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By Tom Farrey, The New York Times (from April 28, 2019)
A decade ago, I wrote a book that comprehensively surveyed the landscape of youth sports. I wanted to know: How did the United States become the world's sports superpower while producing such a physically inactive population? What contribution, if any, did our sports ecosystem play in producing these seemingly opposite outcomes? And, has any nation figured out a more effective model?
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By Ja'Wanda S. Grant, Inside Higher Ed (from April 24, 2019)
Leading change can be draining, especially when you are on the front lines. If you think about organizational change using the tug-of-war concept, imagine that one team pulls toward change and the other team completely resists change. Imagine the tension in the middle. This is where you find most middle managers and administrators like me.
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By Julia Hodges, ReDesigning High School (from April 18, 2019)
When most of us think back to group projects in school, it is not a fond memory. You know, there was that one kid who didn't contribute anything, so the rest of you had to work harder. Or there was the bossy kid who took control of the whole thing and wouldn't listen to your ideas. Maybe you were one of those kids. Either way, many of us view group projects in school as a negative experience. Maybe they taught us some valuable lessons about working with different people, but maybe not.
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By Bernard Marr, Forbes (from April 29, 2019)
Since we're in the midst of the transformative impact of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, the time is now to start preparing for the future of work. Even just five years from now, more than one-third of the skills we believe are essential for today's workforce will have changed according to the Future of Jobs Report from the World Economic Forum. Fast-paced technological innovations mean that most of us will soon share our workplaces with artificial intelligences and bots, so how can you stay ahead of the curve?
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By Daniel Vollrath, Edutopia (from May 3, 2019)
It's a repeated experience observed across all grade levels and classrooms—student frustration. Teachers recognize the signs—a defeated sigh, a sheepish glance at the floor, or a demeaning self-directed comment like "I'll never be able to do this," "Forget it, I'm done," or "I'm not smart enough."
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By Michael Boyd, Edutopia (from March 15, 2019)
Since starting my teaching career six months ago, I have learned that I can't expect my students to learn effectively unless they first feel cared for and comfortable in my classroom.
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