Independent Schools Association of the Southwest

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By Daniel Markovitz, The Washington Post (from September 13, 2019)
Meritocracy seems like common sense. Who could possibly object to the idea that people should get ahead based on their own accomplishments, rather than their parents' social class? This seems the natural way to give everyone a fair shot at success. But meritocracy is not the great leveler that we often hold it up to be. The system is rigged. Inequality is as bad as ever. And meritocracy is the culprit.
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By Carla Marschall, Edutopia (from September 10, 2019)
We want our students' learning to be enduring, enabling them to make sense of complexity now and in the future. For this to occur, we need to nudge students beyond the learning of facts and skills to uncover concepts—transferable ideas that transcend time, place, and situation.
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By Amy Webb, Harvard Business Review (from July 30, 2019)
I recently helped a large industrial manufacturing company with its strategic planning process. With so much uncertainty surrounding autonomous vehicles, 5G, robotics, global trade, and the oil markets, the company's senior leaders needed a set of guiding objectives and strategies linking the company's future to the present day. Before our work began in earnest, executives had already decided on a title for the initiative: Strategy 2030.
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By EAB (from September 12, 2019)
Administrators and instructors often recommend the wrong strategies to students when it comes to developing grit, argues David DeSteno, a professor of psychology at Northeastern University, for the Chronicle of Higher Education.
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By Madeline Will, Education Week (from September 16, 2019)
Homecoming kings and queens. Lines for boys and lines for girls. Class rosters with names and gender seemingly set in stone. Schools can be a battleground for transgender students or students who are gender nonconforming. And the potential land mines go far beyond restroom assignments, which have been a politically charged focal point in conversations about transgender youth for the past few years.
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By Audrey Watters, Hacked Education (from August 28, 2019)
The future of education is technological. Necessarily so. Or that's what the proponents of ed-tech would want you to believe. In order to prepare students for the future, the practices of teaching and learning – indeed the whole notion of "school" – must embrace tech-centered courseware and curriculum.
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By Katherine Prince, KnowledgeWorks (from November 27, 2018)
Navigating the Future of Learning is KnowledgeWorks' fifth comprehensive forecast on the future of learning. A new era is unfolding in which exponential advances in digital technologies are causing us to reevaluate our relationships with one another, with our institutions and with ourselves. As part of this shift, we have identified five drivers of change that will impact learning over the next decade and imagine what those drivers of change could mean for education.
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By Simon Romero & Dana Goldstein, The New York Times (from September 18, 2019)
ALBUQUERQUE — In one of the boldest state-led efforts to expand access to higher education, New Mexico is unveiling a plan on Wednesday to make tuition at its public colleges and universities free for all state residents, regardless of family income.
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By Elena Aguilar, Edutopia (from September 12, 2019)
At a school where I worked, when staff gathered for a meeting there were often more elephants in the room than teachers. These elephants—the things that no one wanted to talk about—included dysfunctional team dynamics, unsupported and struggling staff, and issues of racial inequity. In retrospect, I think many staff members really wanted to address these issues but just didn't know how.
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By Donna Orem, Independent Ideas (from September 17, 2019)
In the past 30 years we have seen major shifts in the U.S. K–12 landscape. Religious schools dominated the private school market in the early '90s, with Catholic schools serving more than 50% of students, other religious schools serving 30%, and nonsectarian schools serving less than 15% of that population. Today, those numbers have shifted.
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By John Warner, Inside Higher Ed (from September 18, 2019)
Three years ago I mused that I could make far more money writing essays for contract cheating paper mills than teaching writing. According to reporting from the Chronicle of Higher Education at the time, I could earn $1800 per week writing "reference" materials for paper mills, in contrast to the $2850 per semester-long course adjunct wage I was receiving from College of Charleston.
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By Mike Vachow, Knuckleball Consulting (from September 2, 2019)
How can schools build marketing efforts that support and leverage the enthusiastic praise of current and past families, faculty/staff, alumni and friends? Knuckleball Consulting can recommend excellent marketing consultants who know a lot about search engine optimization, click through rates, psychographic data mining, retargeting, social media strategy, content marketing, etc. What Knuckleball Consulting can help your school understand is what all of these tools are empty without: the complex web of relationships between families and the school that generate loyalty, and the earnest investment in community that schools must make to create them.
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By Aaron C. Cooper, Independent School Magazine (from Summer 2017)
Look at the private school guides in any parenting magazine. How many times do you see the words academic excellence, small class size, personal attention, or character education? How easy is it to distinguish one co-ed school from another?
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